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I found a rook fledgling rook in a road near where I live, which is near a rookery. I couldn’t see any sign of parents, so I brought the bird home. My local wildlife rescue is unable to take the bird and after reading lots of articles on your website I feel I need to make every effort to place the bird back in the rookery, but I am concerned I have left it more than 24 hours. What shall I do?

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  • I found a rook fledgling rook in a road near where I live, which is near a rookery. I couldn’t see any sign of parents, so I brought the bird home. My local wildlife rescue is unable to take the bird and after reading lots of articles on your website I feel I need to make every effort to place the bird back in the rookery, but I am concerned I have left it more than 24 hours. What shall I do?

Unfortunately, it is unlikely that the bird is being accepted back by his or her parents after this prolonged period of time. The safest option would be to find as soon as possible another experienced corvid friendly bird rescue. However, if this is not possible, and the bird is otherwise fit and healthy, one could still try to put the bird on a low isolated branch, one you can reach, where it cannot escape, and where he or she is still being seen and potentially fed by its parents, when the parents hear the bird calling. If this would work, and the parents would return to feed their youngster, then the bird needs to be placed onto a higher branch, in a second step, where he or she can independently climb after the parents. However, there are two major risks to consider. Firstly, the bird might jump down and you loose track of the bird. Secondly, the bird might get attacked or even killed, when out of your reach. The most important thing in this situation is that you need to watch closely from a safe distance, ideally with binoculars.