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I found a jackdaw a year ago with a broken leg. There is no rescue service or anything else where I live. I have been careful to not make it trust humans or pets, but he or she is a confident one, so he will walk up to you and run away again. He loves to bite people and my miniature pincher. He has a large cage and some plastic sticks to sit on. He cleans itself and loves baths. He gets sunlight and has shade if he wants. What does he need in his cage? Can I teach him or help him with anything regarding his behaviour as a jackdaw? Any vitamins or minerals? What is the ideal temperature for him? Can he be released? What should his poo look like? Today he brought up food to his mouth from his stomach and swallowed it again! I think he is sneezing more than usual.

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  • I found a jackdaw a year ago with a broken leg. There is no rescue service or anything else where I live. I have been careful to not make it trust humans or pets, but he or she is a confident one, so he will walk up to you and run away again. He loves to bite people and my miniature pincher. He has a large cage and some plastic sticks to sit on. He cleans itself and loves baths. He gets sunlight and has shade if he wants. What does he need in his cage? Can I teach him or help him with anything regarding his behaviour as a jackdaw? Any vitamins or minerals? What is the ideal temperature for him? Can he be released? What should his poo look like? Today he brought up food to his mouth from his stomach and swallowed it again! I think he is sneezing more than usual.

After one year in captivity, the young jackdaw is not releasable, at least not without prior rehabilitation together with other birds of his or her own kind, something which is a longer process, and which needs to be done by experienced rehabbers with the right setup. Without this rehabilitation process the bird will not survive when released. He or she would not be accepted in the jackdaw community, the bird would be driven away or even killed. Please note, even in expert hands there is no guarantee that an imprinted bird can ever be released.

Jackdaws are very social birds, which need more stimulation, care, interaction and input than for example a dog. Ideally the bird would need company of his or her own kind, and a suitable outdoor aviary. Jackdaws are very demanding when kept as a pet, in particular when getting older and sexually mature, as the bird will bond with you as a partner. Any competition such as pets and human partners included, may get a difficult life, depending a little bit on the birds personality, in terms of severity. Jackdaws need social interaction, so keeping her or him in a cage and depriving the bird of the required interaction would not be fair and will cause long term psychological problems.

With regards to sneezing. Although there are several problems to consider, the most likely one are internal parasites such as lung or gape worms. The best would be to find a corvid friendly experienced veterinary surgeon, who can run some tests and is able to prescribe the appropriate medication. Please check out our corvid care page for more detailed information.

Corvid Care