Jackdaw Ranjit – An Obituary

Jackdaw Ranjit

29th September 2021

Jackdaw Ranjit came to us as a very poorly nestling after a nest fall in June 2016. At the time we fought very hard to save his life, as he came to us in shock and with signs of severe malnutrition and dehydration. As it is often the case in wildlife rescue and rehabilitation, we did not exactly know what has happened to him. However, it was very likely that Ranjit was the so called ‘runt’ of the brood, as he was not just poorly but appeared also underdeveloped for his age compared to his siblings. The runt of a group of birds hatched from the same clutch of eggs is usually the smallest and weakest of them.

Jay Clive and jackdaw Ranjit
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First Aid For Birds – How To Treat A Bumblefoot Infection

Eagle owl

Pododermatitis, commonly known as “bumblefoot”, has become a frequently seen disease in companion and aviary birds. Pododermatitis is a general term for any inflammatory or degenerative condition of the avian foot. Pododermatitis may occur in any avian species, but is particularly problematic in permanently and temporarily captive birds, such as birds of prey, chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, swans, waders, seabirds as well as canaries, finches, budgerigars and cockatiels.

Mute swan
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Treatment of Avian Pox

Sparrow

Most avian species are susceptible to one or more of the avian poxvirus strains and / or species. It has been reported that naturally occurring avian pox infections can affect about 60 species of wild birds, comprising 20 families. Poxviruses can be transmitted in a number of different ways. Even though they are unable to penetrate unbroken skin, small abrasions are sufficient to permit infection. The most common method of transmission is by means of biting insects such as mosquitos, mites, midges or flies. Many biting insects have been shown to be mechanical vectors only, transferring the virus from infected to susceptible birds by contamination of their skin-piercing mouthparts. Transmission can also occur directly by contact between infected and susceptible birds or by contact with contaminated objects, such as bird feeder perches. Aerosol transmission, although rare, can occur from viruses being carried along with dust, particularly in confined situations such as aviaries. At the time of year when vectors are at the highest numbers, avian pox transmission is greatest.1

Wood pigeon
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