First Aid for Birds – Cat Caught Birds

Robin fledgling

If a cat brings a caught bird indoors, then immediate action is needed to save the bird’s life. The animal has to be freed immediately out of the cat’s mouth or claws. A very quick assessment of the animal is essential, which is being done with the aim to find open or displaced fractures, wounds involving in particular chest and abdomen and to detect signs of an acute bleed. An actively bleeding wound needs to be treated immediately. The best option is to use clean tissues or kitchen towels to compress the bleeding area gently but firmly until the bleed has stopped. Even a small amount of lost blood can result into a severe irreversible shock situation in birds. This is particularly true for small birds species.

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First Aid For Birds – Impact Trauma

Carrion crow fledglings

If a bird is being found sitting on the pavement, fluffed up and lethargic, or is found lying on his or her back on the road or underneath a window, then it is very likely that the animal has suffered an impact trauma. Affected birds are often found unconscious or apathic. Window strikes or car collisions are the most common types of accidents leading to a concussion, spinal contusion or a combination of both.

Pheasant

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The Myth Of Humane Lethal Wildlife Management

Fox cub

Let me get straight to the point – wildlife management using lethal methods such as culling or killing is not just unethical and unnecessary, it is scientifically proven to be inefficient in almost all cases, in particular long-term. However, despite this common knowledge, governments, farmers, hunters, gamekeepers, pest controllers and many conservationists will almost exclusively suggest lethal methods of wildlife control as the most effective solution in wildlife conservation, wildlife management and to address any wildlife related problem. Scientific evidence suggesting the opposite will be commonly ignored, wrongly interpreted, or used out of context. There are many known factors, which influence public opinion and behaviour, but also common and widely accepted management practices. First we will highlight some of the more common problems and misperceptions, as this kind of background information may prove useful for the general understanding, before we will explore examples of lethal wildlife management and their consequences.

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Feeding Wild Birds In The Winter

Song thrush

During the summer months birds require high protein foods, especially during their moult. During cold winter weather birds will benefit from high-energy or high-fat foods, which will  help them to maintain their fat reserves and to survive frosty nights. Autumn is the time to change the composition of bird foods offered and perhaps the arrangement of your feeders. It is relatively easy to plan for winter bird feeding.

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Why Not To Light A Bonfire – Updated

Dragonfly

It is soon the time of the year again, when social media messages are piling up in your ‘virtual inbox’ advising you to check your garden woodpile for hedgehogs before you start a bonfire. And you certainly should, if you really cannot live without a bonfire wiping out a whole mini ecosystem, annoying your neighbours, causing asthma attacks and polluting the environment.

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