Have you found a bird which has been attacked by a cat or dog?

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Have you found a bird which has been attacked by a cat or dog?

The saliva of cats and dogs contains Pasteurella multocida bacteria, which cause fatal infections in birds, mammals and reptiles within a few hours, if not treated with appropriate antibiotics as soon as possible.

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What shall I do now?

Keep the bird safe and warm and get in touch immediately with your local wildlife rescue or rehabber. Please do not release a bird without obvious signs of an injury. A tiny scratch or puncture wound is enough to seed the potentially fatal infection.

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Thank you very much. #corvid_isle
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Nesting Season – Spring Wildlife Advice

As this year’s nesting season is already in full swing, it seems appropriate to address some common problems wildlife rescues and rehabbers encounter every year. Most importantly it is worth noting that due to the small size of our sanctuary and our work commitments we are unable to attend wildlife rescues or to give timely social media, email or telephone advice in ongoing emergency or rescue situations.

Starling
Juvenile starling

However, if you have a question regarding bird or specifically corvid rescue, care or rehabilitation, then please check out our Corvid Care page or alternatively go to our Forum. Both sources contain a multitude of information about wildlife and bird emergencies in general and will also give detailed information referring specifically to corvids. For your convenience we have provided a few especially important links here in this blog post. These links will give you access to blog posts containing essential pieces of information about who to rescue and who to leave alone and how to recognise and catch a poorly or sick bird. Furthermore, these links will also provide you with detailed information about general life saving first aid measures focussing in particular on injuries inflicted by freely roaming unsupervised pet cats, which will save lives and will increase chances of survival aimed to bridge the time gap until a patient is being handed over into the care of an experienced wildlife rescue or rehabber.

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Why Fireworks Should Be Abolished

So called silent firework displays, which are in fact not silent at all, unless they are replaced by laser shows, are increasingly praised as the ultimate solution when it comes to addressing animal welfare concerns. At the first glance silent fireworks seem to be a logical solution, as reduced noise pollution is addressing one of the best known problems in this context. However, as it is commonly the case, there is the bigger picture to consider, and that is where the controversy starts, at least for people who feel very strongly that fireworks are part of their cherished traditions and well deserved rights, and of course for people, who have some sort of financial interest in the business of producing, selling or using fireworks.

Mallard family
Mallard family

Most people would agree that we should not do any intentional harm to other sentient beings, be it directly or indirectly. Fireworks have a proven negative impact onto our shared environment, and are therefore potentially harming other human and non-human animals, who are unlikely to have given consent to being harmed, neither in the short nor in the long term. This simply means that by using any type of firework, intentional harm is being done to others, which is ethically not justifiable. Therefore we could actually stop at this point, but for the sake of the argument, let us look a bit more in detail into the threats and problems caused by fireworks.

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In Memory of Magpie Sophie

Magpie Luca

We would like to use this opportunity to give our condolences to Sophie’s family. We would also like to thank Sophie’s family and carer for all the hard work they did and for taking good care of Sophie, enabling so many people to become part of Sophie’s life. Last but not least we would like to thank Sophie’s family for nominating us as a worthy cause to support and for all the subsequent kind and generous donations, which are greatly appreciated by us and the birds in our corvid sanctuary.

Twitter account of Sophie The Magpie

Magpies exploring the garden
Magpies exploring the garden

Sophie has been an ambassador in a world, where animals are mostly regarded as objects or possessions, where magpies and many other animal species did not make it into the worthy group of animals enjoying preferential consideration and treatment. Also, many people often think of a species as a large body of ‘others’. Sophie has helped people to understand, that a species is made up of unique beings, as she gave us the opportunity to get to know her as an individual, a sentient being, not any different to animals humans tend to love and admire more frequently, such as dogs or parrots. Please do not forget, the next magpie you see in the woods or in the garden is an individual like Sophie. She made us realise that every individual of a species matters, and without any doubt, Sophie did.

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Jackdaw Izzy – An Obituary

Jackdaw Izzy

26th October 2021

In July 2020 we took over the care of juvenile Jackdaw Izzy. He has been rescued and cared for by kind members of staff of Monkey Haven, the Isle of Wight Primate Rescue Centre. Izzy suffered a severe concussion and spinal contusion with paralysis of both legs as well as a badly bruised wing. It took him about 4 weeks to recover, but he still showed persisting problems with his right wing and lack of power in both legs, when he came into our care. He was also clearly imprinted and still dependent on being hand fed.

Jackdaw Izzy
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